New Visions of the Countryside of Roman Britain

Les trois volumes du programme New Visions of the Countryside of Roman Britain, parus entre 2016 et 2018, sont intégralement téléchargeables. Le site internet du projet est consultable sur Archaeology Data Service.

  • Alexander Smith, Martyn Allen, Tom Brindle et Michael Fulford, New visions of the countryside of Roman Britain 1. The rural settlement of Roman Britain, Londres, Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, coll. « Britannia Monograph Series » (no29), 2016 (page de téléchargement)

The mass of new data produced since the onset of developer-funded archaeology in 1990 has provided the basis for a new regional framework for the study of rural Roman Britain in which a rich characterisation has been developed of the mosaic of communities that inhabited the province and the way that they changed over time. Centre stage is the farmstead, rather than the villa, which has for so long dominated discourse in the study of Roman Britain; variations in farmstead type, building form and associated landscape context are all explored in order to breathe new life into our understanding of the Romano-British countryside.

Compte-rendu d’Alain Ferdière sur le blog Ager (2018).

  • Martyn Allen, Lisa Lodwick, Tom Brindle, Michael Fulford et Alexander Smith, New visions of the countryside of Roman Britain 2. The rural economy of Roman Britain, Londres, Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, coll. « Britannia Monograph Series » (no30), 2017 (page de téléchargement)

This richly illustrated volume considers the rural economy of Roman Britain through the lenses of the principal occupations of agriculture and rural industries. For the first time, the faunal and archaeobotanical data have been drawn together alongside material culture, particularly the evidence of coins and pottery, as well as structural evidence, to provide a social context for rural production and consumption, and an understanding of how resources moved across the province to feed and support military and civil populations. Meeting the demands of the state remained a major driving force behind the rural economy throughout the Roman period.

Compte-rendu d’Alain Ferdière dans le tome 57 (2018) de la RACF.

  • Alexander Smith, Martyn Allen, Tom Brindle, Michael Fulford, Lisa Lodwick et Anna Rohnbogner, New visions of the countryside of Roman Britain 3. Life and death in the countryside of Roman Britain, Londres, Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, coll. « Britannia Monograph Series » (no31), 2018 (page de téléchargement)

This volume focuses upon the people of rural Roman Britain – how they looked, lived, interacted with the material and spiritual worlds surrounding them, and also how they died, and what their physical remains can tell us. Analyses indicate a geographically and socially diverse society, influenced by pre-existing cultural traditions and varying degrees of social connectivity. Incorporation into the Roman Empire certainly brought with it a great deal of social change, though contrary to many previous accounts depicting bucolic scenes of villa-life, it would appear that this change was largely to the detriment of many of those living in the countryside.

Compte-rendu d’Alain Ferdière dans le tome 58 (2019) de la RACF.


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search